TARA J. REYNON, MSW


Tara Reynon is a member of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians and is a co-founder of NACCWA. She has an extensive background and more than a decade of experience as a social worker focused on Indian child welfare. She offers a unique perspective, having worked directly with children and families, as well as at the tribal level to develop policies and procedures for the benefit of Native children.

Prior to launching NACCWA, Tara served as Executive Director of the Puyallup Tribe Children’s Services Department. In that role, she developed and implemented tribal policies and programs for Child Protection Services, Family Preservation Services and Independent Living Skills for Native foster care youth. She also managed all aspects of the department’s administration including staff supervision, budget reports, strategic planning and grant management.

As a consultant, she has represented the interests of many tribes and tribal families across the country. Among her career highlights, Tara successfully advocated for an Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) case in the State of Oklahoma which resulted in a state Supreme Court ruling that changed the way that ICWA is implemented in that state. In addition, as Chairwoman of the Puyallup Tribal Sexual Offender Registration and Notification Act (SORNA), Tara developed the Puyallup Tribe’s codes and polices related to this federal act.

Tara is a regular presenter at conferences focused on child abuse and neglect in Indian Country as well as compliance to the Indian Child Welfare Act. She has also served as a guest lecturer at the University of Washington on the history and implementation of Indian Child Welfare Practice. In addition, Tara organized an Inter-Tribal collaboration to improve ICWA compliance and served on the Local Indian Child Welfare Act Committee (LICWAC) with the State of Washington.

Tara earned her undergraduate degree in social work from Pacific Lutheran University and her Master’s of Social Work from the University of Washington.


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